Posts in English, translation

Why I Love Being a Translator

traduzione

It’s been four (yes, FOUR!) years since I last wrote a post on my blog. I know, it’s been a very long time. I have been busy with my MA course, and I also started working on my thesis, which will be on French literary translation (more details about it in upcoming posts).

Today is one of those days in which I love my job, and I feel proud to be a translator! I am glad I chose this path, I realised that I found my calling. I am writing this post after attending the TetraTeTra translation conference in Forlì, which I enjoyed. It’s 12:37 a.m. right now but, instead of going to bed, I decided to write a post on the reasons why I love being a translator. Here they are:

1) The sense of satisfaction and completion I feel after finding le mot juste, or after finishing the translation of a text;

2) It’s an enriching job which allows you to expand your knowledge in both source and target languages. Two words: lifelong learning;

3) As a freelancer, I can have a flexible working schedule, by adapting it to what needs to be done that day. I can work at home and fully concentrate on the text I’m working on.

That’s all for now. The bed is waiting for me… I’m tired, but happy!

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Translation & Interpreting

Happy International Translation Day!

First of all, I’m wishing all translators, interpreters and students specializing in Translation and/or Interpreting a happy International Translation Day, which is celebrated every year on September 30th on the feast of St. Jerome, the Patron Saint of Translators.

According to Wikipedia,

The celebrations have been promoted by FIT (the International Federation of Translators) ever since it was set up in 1953. In 1991 FIT launched the idea of an officially recognised International Translation Day to show solidarity of the worldwide translation community in an effort to promote the translation profession in different countries (not necessarily only in Christian ones). This is an opportunity to display pride in a profession that is becoming increasingly essential in the era of progressing globalisation.

According to the International Translators Association,

[…] the challenge of International Translation Day remains the same: to raise awareness of the translation profession.

For those who didn’t know, St. Jerome is the Patron Saint of archeologists, archivists, Bible scholars, librarians, libraries, schoolchildren, students and translators. You can read about his life and works on this Wikipedia article. Two years ago, Jill Sommers posted a very detailed post about him, which was also about the way he worked as a translator (he revised and translated parts of the Bible into Latin, and awarded sainthood thanks to the services he rendered to the Church). Quoting  the article posted on the TIHOF’s website:

Jerome’s humility regarding his own work set a good example for translators who followed him. He freely admitted ignorance, even embarrassment, when warranted, and revisited some of his translations, making corrections and additions. On the other hand, he also pointed out that a translation’s accuracy depended greatly on the reliability of the source text: copyists often inadvertently introduced errors, which would be compounded and passed down through the centuries.

The International Translation Day has a different theme every year. This year’s theme is Translation Quality for a Variety of Voices.

Many translation-related events are organized on this day. For example, ProZ.com’s Translation3 virtual conference, starting at 10 am GMT, which runs for 12 hours and you can attend for free. Always speaking of ProZ.com, some members even organize pow-wows.